Water Conservation & Irrigation Policies

Proposed/Draft Irrigation Policy 2021: DRAFT POLICY

THE HYDROGEOLOGIC TECHNICAL REPORT GROUNDWATER MODELING PROJECT OF GROUNDWATER SURFACE WATER INTERACTION OF THE LITTLE RIVER AND THE COTUIT WELL FIELD CAN BE FOUND: HERE

Addition information regarding Fertigation Wells can be found by clicking here.

The moratorium on installing new automatic in-ground irrigations systems has been extended through July 23, 2021 per vote of the Board of Water Commissioners on 6/16/21.

Click the link below to view the Conservation Advisory:

WATER CONSERVATION ADVISORY APRIL 2020

AUTOMATIC IN-GROUND IRRIGATION CONNECTION MORATORIUM EXTENDED

On March 24, 2021 the Cotuit Water Commission voted unanimously to extend a moratorium on new connections to the Cotuit public drinking water supply for automatic, in-ground irrigation systems for an additional three months until June 24, 2021.  The Commission plans to have a Regulation or Policy in place by that time.  During the previous moratorium the Commission held a public workshop and has retained the services of a hydrogeologic consultant to evaluate the effects of pumping at the main wellfield upon flow in the Little River and associated wetlands.  Preliminary results of this analysis suggest that the peak summer pumping rates are likely to be significantly reducing flow in the Little River.  Final results of the analysis are expected to be presented at the Commissions April 21, 2021 meeting at 5:45 PM. Join us via zoom using the following link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/3462071880 .

The Commission is concerned that peak summer pumping is exceeding our permit levels and that natural water bodies including streams and wetlands are being de-watered by the excessive pumping.  Lawn irrigation is estimated to consume approximately 50% of the summer pumping.

Among the items which the Commission is exploring are a permanent ban on new irrigation systems, upgrading and maintaining “smart” irrigation technologies, separate metering, premium pricing, eventual disconnections of existing irrigation systems and possible replacement with individual private on-lot irrigation wells.  Residents may opt for installing their own on-lot private wells for irrigation taking the demand off the public drinking water system.  With the new water rates that encourage conservation and reduced pumping, the costs associated with a private on-lot irrigation well are more favorable.

How Much Water Do I Use?

In general, per capita water use ranges from 40 to 80gallons per day (gpd) in the eastern United States.

Type of Usage Per Person

  • Shower or tub 15 – 25
  • Sink 3 – 5
  • Toilet 5 – 15
  • Washing clothes 10 – 20
  • Washing dishes 5 – 10
  • Cooking 1 – 2
  • Miscellaneous 1 – 3
  • Total: 40 – 80 Gallons Per Person Per Day

Fact: 5/8 inch hose will normally discharge at a rate of about 3 to 5 gallons per minute. The use of an outside hose for 30 minutes would consume 90 to 150 gallons or double the use of water within the home during 24 hours.

Fact: Little leaks add up in a hurry. A faucet drip or invisible toilet leak that totals only twotablespoons a minute comes to 15 gallonsa day. That’s 105 gallons a week and 5,460wasted gallons of water a year!

Conservation Tips:

  • Install rain sensors on sprinkler systems
  • Water lawns in early morning
  • Don’t run the hose while washing the car
  • Check for toilet leaks (free test kits available)
  • Utilize low-flow shower heads and fixtures
  • Turn water off while brushing teeth
  • Run dishwashers and washing machines with full loads only

Gardening:

Try the concept of XeriscapeTM (pronounced zeer-ah-scape),which means “landscaping for water conservation.”

The idea is to use plants that require less water.You also can decorate creatively with interesting objects that need no water at all, such as rocks, bricks, benches, gravel, and deck areas.